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  • May 18, 2021

Exclusive: Flaws In John Deere’s Website Provides a Map To Customers, Equipment

 Exclusive: Flaws In John Deere’s Website Provides a Map To Customers, Equipment


chicksdaddy shares a report from The Security Ledger: Websites for customers of agricultural equipment maker John Deere contained vulnerabilities that could have allowed a remote attacker to harvest sensitive information on the company’s customers including their names, physical addresses and information on the Deere equipment they own and operate, The Security Ledger reported. The researcher known as “Sick Codes” published two advisories on Thursday warning about the flaws in the myjohndeere.com website and the John Deere Operations Center website and mobile applications. In a conversation with Security Ledger, the researcher said that a he was able to use VINs (vehicle identification numbers) taken from a farm equipment auction site to identify the name and physical address of the owner. Furthermore, a flaw in the myjohndeere.com website could allow an unauthenticated user to carry out automated attacks against the site, possibly revealing all the user accounts for that site.

Sick Codes disclosed both flaws to John Deere and also to the U.S. Government’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), which monitors food and agriculture as a critical infrastructure sector. The information obtained from the John Deere websites, including customer names and addresses, could put the company afoul of data security laws like California’s CCPA or the Personal Information Protection Act in Deere’s home state of Illinois. However, the national security consequences of the company’s leaky website could be far greater. Details on what model combines and other equipment is in use on what farm could be of very high value to an attacker, including nation-states interested in disrupting U.S. agricultural production at key junctures, such as during planting or harvest time.

The consolidated nature of U.S. farming means that an attacker with knowledge of specific, Internet connected machinery in use by a small number of large-scale farming operations in the midwestern United States could launch targeted attacks on that equipment that could disrupt the entire U.S. food supply chain, researchers warn. The Agriculture sector and firms that supply it, like Deere, lag other industries in cyber security preparedness and resilience. A 2019 report (PDF) released by Department of Homeland Security concluded that the “adoption of advanced precision agriculture technology and farm information management systems in the crop and livestock sectors is introducing new vulnerabilities” (and that) “potential threats to precision agriculture were often not fully understood or were not being treated seriously enough by the front-line agriculture producers.”





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